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Fall 2017 Course Schedule

 

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      LLSJ 2001 A   News, Narrative & Design I  (CRN:3740) *BEST BET* 4 CR Gregory, Kia
      TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
      TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
  • This is the first course in a 3-course sequence that introduces students to journalism as a distinct form of media, one that serves as part of the democratic checks-and-balances system. This level 1 class will focus on needs-based reporting ù a bottoms-up approach using human-centered design practices to identify the informational needs and concerns of the community being served. Through real, project-based work, students will research, report and express the news while considering how to best engage their audience and have impact. Students will also be introduced to the complexity and competitiveness of the 21st century media ecosystem.In this initial class, students will focus on clear writing and learn the rudiments of visual storytelling. In the second half of the semester, students will begin working collaboratively. A designer to introduce human-centered design processes and a data reporter are embedded in the class.
    •   LLSJ 2001 B   News, Narrative & Design I  (CRN:3741) *BEST BET* 4 CR Gregory, Kia
        TR - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
        TR - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
    • This is the first course in a 3-course sequence that introduces students to journalism as a distinct form of media, one that serves as part of the democratic checks-and-balances system. This level 1 class will focus on needs-based reporting ù a bottoms-up approach using human-centered design practices to identify the informational needs and concerns of the community being served. Through real, project-based work, students will research, report and express the news while considering how to best engage their audience and have impact. Students will also be introduced to the complexity and competitiveness of the 21st century media ecosystem.In this initial class, students will focus on clear writing and learn the rudiments of visual storytelling. In the second half of the semester, students will begin working collaboratively. A designer to introduce human-centered design processes and a data reporter are embedded in the class.
      •   LLSJ 2001 B   News, Narrative & Design I  (CRN:3741) *BEST BET* 4 CR Gregory, Kia
          TR - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
          TR - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
      • This is the first course in a 3-course sequence that introduces students to journalism as a distinct form of media, one that serves as part of the democratic checks-and-balances system. This level 1 class will focus on needs-based reporting ù a bottoms-up approach using human-centered design practices to identify the informational needs and concerns of the community being served. Through real, project-based work, students will research, report and express the news while considering how to best engage their audience and have impact. Students will also be introduced to the complexity and competitiveness of the 21st century media ecosystem.In this initial class, students will focus on clear writing and learn the rudiments of visual storytelling. In the second half of the semester, students will begin working collaboratively. A designer to introduce human-centered design processes and a data reporter are embedded in the class.
        •   LLSJ 2001 C   News, Narrative & Design I  (CRN:3978) 4 CR Eskin, Blake
            MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
            MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
        • This is the first course in a 3-course sequence that introduces students to journalism as a distinct form of media, one that serves as part of the democratic checks-and-balances system. This level 1 class will focus on needs-based reporting ù a bottoms-up approach using human-centered design practices to identify the informational needs and concerns of the community being served. Through real, project-based work, students will research, report and express the news while considering how to best engage their audience and have impact. Students will also be introduced to the complexity and competitiveness of the 21st century media ecosystem.In this initial class, students will focus on clear writing and learn the rudiments of visual storytelling. In the second half of the semester, students will begin working collaboratively. A designer to introduce human-centered design processes and a data reporter are embedded in the class.
          •   LLSJ 2001 D   News, Narrative & Design I  (CRN:4547) 4 CR Eskin, Blake
              MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
              MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
          • This is the first course in a 3-course sequence that introduces students to journalism as a distinct form of media, one that serves as part of the democratic checks-and-balances system. This level 1 class will focus on needs-based reporting ù a bottoms-up approach using human-centered design practices to identify the informational needs and concerns of the community being served. Through real, project-based work, students will research, report and express the news while considering how to best engage their audience and have impact. Students will also be introduced to the complexity and competitiveness of the 21st century media ecosystem.In this initial class, students will focus on clear writing and learn the rudiments of visual storytelling. In the second half of the semester, students will begin working collaboratively. A designer to introduce human-centered design processes and a data reporter are embedded in the class.
            •   LLSJ 2010 AX   Ethics and History of Journalism  (CRN:4180) 4 CR Golway, Terrence
                W - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                W - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
            • [subject] This course situates contemporary journalism in its historical context and grounds students in the fundamental ethical principles of the discipline. The course will introduce the concept of journalism as a system by which a society shares information, and an integral part of the democratic checks and balances system. History will extend back to the oral tradition in ancient Rome to the 17th century coffeehouses of London to the birth of the first newspapers, and look at disruptive technologies like the printing press, radio, television and the Internet. The class will examine the effects on society of government-controlled press and consider ideas of the effect of corporate control in contemporary journalism, as well as look at different contemporary models like the American notion of neutrality versus the European system of Liberal and Conservative outlets. Emphasis will be placed on changing notions of what it has meant historically to be a good journalist, and establishing the guiding ethics of telling the truth, transparency, independence and serving the public good.
              •   LLSJ 2010 BX   Ethics and History of Journalism  (CRN:4550) 4 CR Stellin, Susan   M - 3:50 pm to 6:30 pm
                  M - 3:50 pm to 6:30 pm
              • [subject] This course situates contemporary journalism in its historical context and grounds students in the fundamental ethical principles of the discipline. The course will introduce the concept of journalism as a system by which a society shares information, and an integral part of the democratic checks and balances system. History will extend back to the oral tradition in ancient Rome to the 17th century coffeehouses of London to the birth of the first newspapers, and look at disruptive technologies like the printing press, radio, television and the Internet. The class will examine the effects on society of government-controlled press and consider ideas of the effect of corporate control in contemporary journalism, as well as look at different contemporary models like the American notion of neutrality versus the European system of Liberal and Conservative outlets. Emphasis will be placed on changing notions of what it has meant historically to be a good journalist, and establishing the guiding ethics of telling the truth, transparency, independence and serving the public good.
                •   LLSJ 2100 A   Documentary Photography  (CRN:6667) 4 CR Lichtenstein, Andrew   MW - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                    MW - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                • "The camera is a tool to engage, socially and politically, the world around us. Students will immerse themselves in documentary practices to craft stories with photographs, video, sound, and text. Through close readings of photographic essays, a historical range of photojournalism books, and news reportage, students will learn how to read photographs to gain an understanding of ""visual literacy."" Our emphasis will be on process (drafting proposals, conducting research, gaining access), as well as practice (editing and building sequencing skills). Through trial and error, students will learn which ideas translate visually, which do not, and why. Students should be prepared to make mistakes, learn by weekly photographic assignments and for the second half of the term, iteration: returning to the same photographic subject matter over and over. Collaboration will be encouraged as we use the classroom as a lab to critique each others' work. Students must have access to a digital camera, smart phone or SLR, and a basic familiarity with an editing application. This class is strongly recommended for all Journalism + Design majors."
                  •   LLSJ 2125 AX   Facts/Alternative Facts  (CRN:6699) *BEST BET* 4 CR Schillinger, Liesl   T - 12:10 pm to 2:50 pm
                      T - 12:10 pm to 2:50 pm
                  • What is "fake news?" How does it differ from "real" news; and how can you ensure your own writing is accurate? This course looks at how journalists and writers can safeguard the truthùand their own careersùat a time when press freedom is under unprecedented attack. Students will read excerpts and articles that address the importance of truth and the danger of error (intended or accidental) in news reporting and literary journalism. Readings range from the founding of our democracy to the Internet age, from Thomas Jefferson's letters on a free press; to articles on the birth of the Soviet propaganda organ Pravda; to excerpts from novels like Orwell's 1984; to Jay McInerney's Bright Lights Big City, which brought the position of "fact checker" to national attention. Students also gain a practical instruction on how to fact-check, using the methods of The New Yorker magazine's fact checking department, and including visits from distinguished professional fact checkers. The two-fold goal of the course is to deepen students' understanding of the power of fact in society, and to increase their ability to control the accuracy of their own work. (Strongly recommended for all Journalism+Design Majors and Minors)
                    •   LLSJ 2150 A   Understanding Polls  (CRN:6671) *BEST BET* 2 CR Yeip, Randy   T - 4:00 pm to 5:50 pm
                        T - 4:00 pm to 5:50 pm
                    • This course will investigate how polling is used in the media, focusing most on political and election polls. We'll discuss how polls are conducted, what makes them trustworthy (or not), and how to determine what the numbers really mean. Students will learn to be savvy and critical data consumers, as well as develop an understanding of the challenges faced in the polling field.
                      •   LLSJ 2175 A   Finding the Stories in Visual Data Sets  (CRN:6701) *BEST BET* 2 CR Keegan, Jonathan   W - 4:00 pm to 5:50 pm
                          W - 4:00 pm to 5:50 pm
                      • Space probe imagery, government pill databases and social media photos all contain a treasure trove of data û some in the imagery itself, others in the metadata. In this class we'll learn tools and techniques for gathering, analyzing and presenting the data hidden within large visual data sets. We will also explore how to present these data as news projects that readers will remember.
                        •   LLSJ 2200 A   The Art and Craft of the Interview  (CRN:6672) 2 CR Snider, Suzanne   T - 9:50 am to 11:40 am
                            T - 9:50 am to 11:40 am
                        • In this 12-week workshop, we'll develop deep listening skills as the heart of an ethical interview practice, framing the interview as an opportunity for mutual transformation, reparation, and empathy. How can we support and amplify the voices of those who largely go unheard and unrecorded? How can our interviews serve to mobilize individual interviewees and entire communities? Our time together will include listening exercises, tech tutorials, project design and discussion. We'll critique examples of powerful interview-based work across media that emphasize the interview process as well as the product. These examples (photography, video, radio documentary and print) will serve as inspiration for students' work. In building our eclectic skill set, we readily borrow from adjacent fields (psychoanalysis, oral history, and acoustic ecology among others) to explore a range of relevant topics including trauma, insider-outsider dynamics, reciprocity, collaborative analysis, and the power of silence.
                          •   LLSJ 2241 A   Web Fundamentals  (CRN:6514) *BEST BET* 2 CR Ackerman, Alexandra
                              T - 6:00 pm to 7:50 pm
                              T - 6:00 pm to 7:50 pm
                          • [Medium or Elective] This class is specially designed for people who think code, math, and computers in general are intimidating. Through a series of playful challenges, students will learn how computers, code, and the Web actually work. Along the way, students will pick up valuable skills and knowledge that will allow them to do more complex interactive projects in the future. It's strongly recommended that this class be taken in tandem with or before News, Narrative & Design II.
                            •   LLSJ 2241 B   Web Fundamentals  (CRN:6515) *BEST BET* 2 CR Alexander, Anila
                                R - 6:00 pm to 7:50 pm
                                R - 6:00 pm to 7:50 pm
                            • [Medium or Elective] This class is specially designed for people who think code, math, and computers in general are intimidating. Through a series of playful challenges, students will learn how computers, code, and the Web actually work. Along the way, students will pick up valuable skills and knowledge that will allow them to do more complex interactive projects in the future. It's strongly recommended that this class be taken in tandem with or before News, Narrative & Design II.
                              •   LLSJ 2602 A   Hearing News: Audio Journalism Principles and Production  (CRN:6516) *BEST BET* 2 CR Montague, Sarah
                                  R - 6:00 pm to 7:50 pm
                                  R - 6:00 pm to 7:50 pm
                              • Students in this course will learn hands-on techniques for critiquing and reporting news relevant to the New School community in its unique New York City context. Emphasis will be on dynamic engagement with the real-world environment of New York City and in developing reporting, storytelling, and production skills for today's public media environment. Students will learn to identify and research stories; interview subjects and sources; radio/audio journalism protocols and ethics; record in the studio and in the field; write good radio/audio scripts; and basic audio production. Completed audio stories will be featured on WNSR, New School Radio, the New School's online radio station.
                                •   LLSJ 3001 AX   News, Narrative & Design II  (CRN:3742) *BEST BET* 4 CR Gregory, Kia
                                    W - 3:50 pm to 6:30 pm
                                    W - 3:50 pm to 6:30 pm
                                • This is the second course in a three-course sequence preparing students to do creative and rigorous journalism in a highly competitive and complex media ecosystem. Increased attention will be paid to using design strategies to identify community needs and problem solve audience engagement, considering such factors as context for consumption and multi-channel participation. Brainstorming, research and other design strategies will be used to imagine new ways of reporting and expressing the news. In addition to growing expectations for depth of reporting, increased emphasis will be on creative presentation of work, and telling stories visually as well as through writing. The class is project-based and collaborative. A designer and a data reporter are embedded in the class. Other experts will be brought in based on student need. Students must have already taken News, Narrative & Design I to register.
                                  •   LLSJ 3001 AX   News, Narrative & Design II  (CRN:3742) *BEST BET* 4 CR Gregory, Kia
                                      W - 3:50 pm to 6:30 pm
                                      W - 3:50 pm to 6:30 pm
                                  • This is the second course in a three-course sequence preparing students to do creative and rigorous journalism in a highly competitive and complex media ecosystem. Increased attention will be paid to using design strategies to identify community needs and problem solve audience engagement, considering such factors as context for consumption and multi-channel participation. Brainstorming, research and other design strategies will be used to imagine new ways of reporting and expressing the news. In addition to growing expectations for depth of reporting, increased emphasis will be on creative presentation of work, and telling stories visually as well as through writing. The class is project-based and collaborative. A designer and a data reporter are embedded in the class. Other experts will be brought in based on student need. Students must have already taken News, Narrative & Design I to register.
                                    •   LLSJ 3001 C   News, Narrative & Design II  (CRN:4548) 4 CR Schrank, Delphine   MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                                        MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                                    • This is the second course in a three-course sequence preparing students to do creative and rigorous journalism in a highly competitive and complex media ecosystem. Increased attention will be paid to using design strategies to identify community needs and problem solve audience engagement, considering such factors as context for consumption and multi-channel participation. Brainstorming, research and other design strategies will be used to imagine new ways of reporting and expressing the news. In addition to growing expectations for depth of reporting, increased emphasis will be on creative presentation of work, and telling stories visually as well as through writing. The class is project-based and collaborative. A designer and a data reporter are embedded in the class. Other experts will be brought in based on student need. Students must have already taken News, Narrative & Design I to register.
                                      •   LLSJ 3002 AX   Design for Journalists: From Typography to Interaction  (CRN:3981) 4 CR Greif, Dylan
                                          R - 12:10 pm to 2:50 pm
                                          R - 12:10 pm to 2:50 pm
                                      • [Medium or elective] Do you obsess over fonts? Are you dying to know how to present your work digitally? This course aims to prepare journalists and writers with the basic principles of visual and interaction design crucial to modern-day journalism, starting with the fundamentals of typography, layout, color, information design, wire framing and prototyping for the web. Students will learn HTML and CSS through the historical lens of printing technologies and will explore these concepts through a series of exercises and assignments culminating in a final website project. It is strongly recommended that all Journalism + Design majors take this class, preferably in tandem with or before News, Narrative & Design II.
                                        •   LLSJ 3003 AX   Newsroom Video Production 101  (CRN:5950) *BEST BET* 4 CR Davis, Joshua   T - 7:00 pm to 9:40 pm
                                            T - 7:00 pm to 9:40 pm
                                        • [Medium] This 101 course will introduce students to the basic theories, production methods and workflows of creating video within a digital news organization. The curriculum will be geared toward post¡production, and will emphasize the varying platforms to consider when imagining a video. Students will learn the basics of editing in Adobe Premiere Pro. In this context, post-production encompasses more than simply operating a video editing program. The curriculum will outline the opportunity to create engaging video journalism, utilizing source material from today's immense web of immediately available media. Prescribed assignments will be given, as well as assignments to pitch, research and develop stories. Some assignments will include reporting and shooting in the field. Students will have opportunities to work autonomously, as well as in groups. The course will culminate in a final project û a portfolio piece. This course is recommended for all Journalism + Design majors.
                                          •   LLSJ 3021 A   Transmedia  (CRN:5951) *BEST BET* 4 CR Grinker, Lori   TR - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                              TR - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                          • "[Medium] In this project-based course, students will reinterpret the role of the visual journalist in the transmedia era. The class will interpret the theme "" personal political"" and blur boundaries across disciplines to develop a layered practice that allows for deeper communication and understanding of a documentary subject. Students will work both independently and as collaborators to collect and most effectively produce content that will include still and moving images, sound, text, and ephemera of all varieties. Students will ground their explorations in literature, scholarly articles, and the historical evolution of the digital media form. This class is strongly recommended for all Journalism + Design majors."
                                            •   LLSJ 3028 A   Reading for Writers: Journalism  (CRN:4602) *BEST BET* 4 CR Dray, Philip   MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                            • [Elective] Advocacy journalism allows writers to impart truth through the use of facts and persuasive argument, while bringing a dedication to social justice and also one's personal experiences to bear. In tackling stubborn issues or exposing injustice, advocacy journalists have influenced and even changed the world in which they live, a tradition that lives today in the work of Glenn Greenwald, Naomi Klein, Eric Schlosser, Laura Kipnis, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, among others. Students will learn from our readings of the craft's exemplary practitioners, past and present -- muckrakers Ida B. Wells and Upton Sinclair; social critic H. L. Mencken; writers on conflict and war such as Seymour Hersh and Jonathan Schell; and political commentators Thomas Frank and Heather "Digby" Parton. The course immerses students in current events; discusses the use of humor and satire as advocacy (David Sedaris, Gail Collins); and considers writers who blend fiction, memoir, and journalism (such as Zora Neale Hurston). In a supportive workshop environment, participants will try their hand at various forms of opinion and advocacy writing, and emerge as discerning readers of advocacy journalism, able to apply new journalistic skills to the cogent expression of ideas. This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.
                                              •   LLSJ 3505 AX   Visualizing Data  (CRN:3744) 4 CR Chang, Alvin
                                                  R - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                  R - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                              • [Medium] Sometimes a linear, written narrative is not the best way to express the news. Changes in technology and the growing access to large amounts of data have allowed journalists to develop new and effective ways of engaging readers with hard-to-fathom information. In an age of information overload, sometimes the best way to explain data is visually. This is a major component of reimagining journalistic storytelling in the digital age. Knowing when and how to represent data visually is now an integral part of the discipline. Students will learn basic visualization design and evaluation principles, as well as learn how to acquire, parse and analyze data sets.
                                                •   LLSJ 3505 BX   Visualizing Data  (CRN:4549) *BEST BET* 4 CR Kao, Joanna
                                                    R - 7:00 pm to 9:40 pm
                                                    R - 7:00 pm to 9:40 pm
                                                • [Medium] Sometimes a linear, written narrative is not the best way to express the news. Changes in technology and the growing access to large amounts of data have allowed journalists to develop new and effective ways of engaging readers with hard-to-fathom information. In an age of information overload, sometimes the best way to explain data is visually. This is a major component of reimagining journalistic storytelling in the digital age. Knowing when and how to represent data visually is now an integral part of the discipline. Students will learn basic visualization design and evaluation principles, as well as learn how to acquire, parse and analyze data sets.
                                                  •   LLSJ 3505 BX   Visualizing Data  (CRN:4549) *BEST BET* 4 CR Kao, Joanna
                                                      R - 7:00 pm to 9:40 pm
                                                      R - 7:00 pm to 9:40 pm
                                                  • [Medium] Sometimes a linear, written narrative is not the best way to express the news. Changes in technology and the growing access to large amounts of data have allowed journalists to develop new and effective ways of engaging readers with hard-to-fathom information. In an age of information overload, sometimes the best way to explain data is visually. This is a major component of reimagining journalistic storytelling in the digital age. Knowing when and how to represent data visually is now an integral part of the discipline. Students will learn basic visualization design and evaluation principles, as well as learn how to acquire, parse and analyze data sets.
                                                    •   LLSJ 3521 A   Interaction Design for News Apps  (CRN:6517) *BEST BET* 4 CR Chen, Irwin   TR - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                                        TR - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                                    • [Medium or elective] This course will introduce students to key concepts and foundational principles of UX (user experience) and interaction design in the context of journalism. The 2016 Presidential election exposed the hidden power of interaction design in clickbait, the exploitation of design signals in fake news websites, and behavioral ad targeting. Now more than ever, a real understanding of UX and interaction design will be critical to the success of journalism in all its diverse forms (apps, interactives, visualizations and other news delivery mechanisms). The primary focus of this course will be understanding the behavior of news consumers and how these behaviors can be exploited or changed, building a vocabulary to analyze interactions and designing optimal and ethical interactions for digital news-related applications. Students should have some experience with Photoshop and Illustrator, basic knowledge of wireframing and prototyping, as well as an interest in news and current events. This class is strongly recommended for all Journalism + Design majors. Students must have completed News, Narrative & Design I, or Design for Journalists (with a minimum Grade of B), or be enrolled with permission of the instructor.
                                                      •   LLSJ 3901 A   New School Free Press  (CRN:3743) 4 CR Lichter, Allison
                                                        Das, Jason
                                                          MW - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                                          MW - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                                      • [elective] The New School Free Press is a student-led news organization dedicated to reporting on the university and other subjects important to our audience. Students will work on traditional reporting and editing skills, as well as learn evolving techniques and strategies enabled by new technologies and models. The class is a commitment that involves planning and executing strong, compelling journalism in a variety of platforms. To be an editor, students must submit an application to the current editors and the professor. Positions are determined based on student interest and skill, but include editor-in-chief, managing editors, designers, social media editors, photographers, data visualization editors, and interactive editor from across the university. The class is highly collaborative and only for serious, dedicated students. To be a reporter on the paper, students must have completed News, Narrative, & Design I or have the permission of the instructor.
                                                        •   LLSJ 4001 AX   News, Narrative & Design III  (CRN:3980) 4 CR Lichter, Allison
                                                            M - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                            M - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                        • The final course in a three-course sequence, this advanced class engages students in a creative and rigorous practice of journalism to help prepare them for entering the highly competitive media ecosystem. Students will focus on engaged journalism -- bringing communities into the reporting and news dissemination process -- around a range of subjects relevant to New School communities and beyond, with the goal of understanding how trust is created between news producers and their audiences. We will build our skills as reporters, writers and listeners, with a focus on audio and text-based storytelling practices. A designer and a data reporter are embedded in the course. Students must have already taken News, Narrative, & Design I and II to register.
                                                          •   LLSJ 4001 BX   News, Narrative & Design III  (CRN:5465) 4 CR Mays, Jeffery   F - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                              F - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                          • The final course in a three-course sequence, this advanced class engages students in a creative and rigorous practice of journalism to help prepare them for entering the highly competitive media ecosystem. Students will focus on engaged journalism -- bringing communities into the reporting and news dissemination process -- around a range of subjects relevant to New School communities and beyond, with the goal of understanding how trust is created between news producers and their audiences. We will build our skills as reporters, writers and listeners, with a focus on audio and text-based storytelling practices. A designer and a data reporter are embedded in the course. Students must have already taken News, Narrative, & Design I and II to register.
                                                            •   LLSJ 4991 AX   Senior Capstone  (CRN:6518) 4 CR Meier, Andrew
                                                                F - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                                F - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                            • The Capstone is an opportunity for all graduating seniors majoring in Journalism + Design to develop an original project in a rigorous environment and hone their skills in a final work. The course, taken in an undergraduate's final term, is a four-credit intensive seminar. In a collective of advanced Journalism + Design majors, students will pursue projects across the broadest range of media platforms. Projects can be portfolio-driven (students can build on a portfolio of work culled from previous journalism courses) or be entirely new. No matter the medium, the Capstone class will examine issues of craft, form, content, and process. Projects should aim to be ambitious, and final projects should be polished work, exemplifying the skill and craft of an accomplished journalist. Students must have completed News, Narrative, and Design I, II, + III in order to register for this course.