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Fall 2016 Course Schedule

 

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      LFYW 1000 A   Writing the Essay I: Contemporary Feminisms  (CRN:1937) 4 CR Clifford, Christen
      MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
  • Taylor Swift and Katy Perry say they aren't- but Beyonce and Lena Dunham proudly are.  In this writing intensive course we will look at the recent resurgence of interest in feminism.  Readings will include historical and contemporary texts, as well as pop culture and performance art.  Why is feminism having a moment?  In looking at the intersections between feminism, gender equality and civil rights, why does feminism matter? We will look at feminism through the "waves" – from suffragettes to Amy Schumer, from Ms. Magazine to Rookie, from bell hooks to Roxanne Gay.  Digital events will be looked at in real time during the months this class is in session.  In addition to class discussions and outings to live performances, students will write, workshop and rewrite essays related to the readings.
    •   LFYW 1000 AA   Writing the Essay I: Latin American Short Fiction  (CRN:8475) 4 CR Boggs, Ali (Alexandra)   TR - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
    • This writing-intensive course offers a survey of Latin American short fiction in translation. We'll examine works both canonical and contemporary, from the short stories of Monterroso, Borges, Cortazar, and Lispector, to those of Bellatin, Bolano, and Nettel. The course explores character and conflict, experimental and psychological fiction, as well as the role of voice, descriptive language, and symbols in interpreting fiction. Students will engage with the assigned texts to hone their own writing skills, and will produce two short written works throughout the semester—a book review and close-reading paper—as well as a final 7-page literary-critical essay.
      •   LFYW 1000 B   Writing the Essay I: Writing About Values  (CRN:1454) 4 CR Massimilla, Stephen
          MW - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
      • In this course, students are encouraged to examine the fundamental issues of their lives in order to develop key analytic and argumentative skills. By discussing texts about values, students will consider what is worth striving for and what makes a good or meaningful life. Topics include questions of priorities, definitions of good and evil, questions of cultural and moral relativity, the nature of love, the challenges of suffering and death, and the nature of self-realization. Students will write about social and political issues, including imperialism, minority rights, feminism, food production, and the effect of human "progress" on the environment. Texts may include short works and excerpts by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Euripides, Aristotle, Shakespeare, Woolf, Orwell, Sartre, June Jordan, Al Gore, and Michael Pollan, as well as Eastern and Western religious texts (from the Book of Job to Buddhist texts), and topical newspaper articles. Students will focus on developing logical strategies, grammatical clarity, and rhetorical techniques, as well as close reading and research skills.
        •   LFYW 1000 BB   Writing the Essay I: Critical Conditions: Writing About Health, Illness, and Identity  (CRN:8560) 4 CR Milks, M. Henry (Megan)   MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
        • The World Health Organization understands health to be a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being. While the attainment of health is largely seen as an objective, neutral, apolitical good, we can't overlook the ways in which "health" itself is intensely subjective, wildly contentious, and deeply political. Who gets to decide who and what is healthy? Who gets to decide what kinds of health and health care are most important, and for which bodies? In this writing-intensive course, we will take up personal and critical perspectives on issues surrounding health, illness, disability, and identity, drawing from disability studies, food studies, critical psychiatry, and queer and feminist theory as we do so. Texts may include the ACT UP Oral History Project and writing by Eula Biss, Audre Lorde, and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha.
          •   LFYW 1000 C   Writing the Essay I: Sacrifice and Salvation  (CRN:1455) 4 CR Ebin, Chelsea   TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
          • This writing-intensive course pairs a philosophical investigation of the concepts of sacrifice and salvation with the examination of historically grounded, empirically driven cases. Students investigate the twinned concepts of sacrifice and salvation by critically engaging with secular, religious, and social justice discourses. Course readings will focus on the following authors and themes: martyrdom (St. Perpetua, Soren Kierkegaard; modern terrorism), war (Thucydides; Chris Hedges; torture), the camp (Giorgio Agamben; Primo Levi; detention centers), state violence and civil rights (James Cone; Ta-Nehisi Coates; Black Lives Matter).
            •   LFYW 1000 CC   Writing the Essay I: Living Technologies  (CRN:8561) 4 CR Lemelin, Joseph   MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
            • It is becoming more and more common to speak of everyday objects and technological devices as if they were thinking things that are alive. In this writing-intensive seminar we will investigate representations of unfamiliar forms of thinking and living in technology, literature, film, and philosophy, and will seek to articulate our own responses through a series of writing assignments. Grounded equally in the history of science and science fiction, we will address questions such as: Are we to conceive of the difference between the living and the non-living in strictly biological terms? Can computers, for instance, really think? If so, does that mean they have minds, consciousness, and life? We will examine the boundaries between the living and the non-living across three general headings: weird life, artificial life, and cyborg life. Together we will discuss historical and contemporary treatments of these topics and seek to situate their bearing on culture, gender, and politics.
              •   LFYW 1000 D   Writing the Essay I: Critical Theories of Finance  (CRN:4140) *BEST BET* 4 CR Nadal, Paul
                  MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
              • This writing seminar introduces students to critical theories of finance. We will survey recent and canonical works to arrive at an understanding of finance as an institutional system for the management of money, whose market rationality has extended beyond the economic sector and into other dimensions of human activity. We will begin by asking "What is money?", responding to classical definitions by Aristotle, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx. We will then study money's political lives, as debt and credit, and the kinds of human sociability these forms of capital imply. Finally, we will turn to a social history of 20th-century finance capital, tracing the fall of the international Gold Standard, neoliberalization of U.S. higher education, and the recent global financial crisis. As we examine these topics, our abiding concern will be to consider how money is not so much a thing as a social form, one that shapes fundamental ideas about value, work, personhood, and even our sense of time. We will engage this idea of money as social form from a multi-disciplinary perspective, drawing on readings from David Graeber, Friedrich Nietzsche, Pierre Bourdieu, Wendy Brown, among others.
                •   LFYW 1000 DD   Writing the Essay I: Worth and Power: On Looking and Writing  (CRN:8644) 4 CR Boutsikaris, Nina
                    MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                • Looking, gazing, watching: these are not neutral, passive activities, but rather socially constructed ones, learned relationships of power that affect our lives and shape our effects on others. Images of race, gender, class, and sexuality, though often subliminal, are constantly at work on our subconscious—through the media, advertising, psychological historical legacy, and the environments in which we are raised—informing worth, cultural currency, and social roles. By analyzing a variety of mainly contemporary writing (from authors such as Claudia Rankine, Susan Sontag, Maggie Nelson, T Fleischmann, and Ta-Nehisi Coates) and visual representation, this course will explore how power and worth, human or otherwise, are determined by the ways we look and how we ourselves are looked at. Through writing, workshopping, and re-writing, we will begin to uncover, from an analytical perspective, the breadth of our gaze and how the gaze of others affects our identities. We'll also explore creative techniques writers might call upon to reclaim, subvert, or otherwise negotiate this gaze.
                  •   LFYW 1000 E   Writing the Essay I: Writing About Values  (CRN:1456) 4 CR Massimilla, Stephen
                      MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                  • In this course, students are encouraged to examine the fundamental issues of their lives in order to develop key analytic and argumentative skills. By discussing texts about values, students will consider what is worth striving for and what makes a good or meaningful life. Topics include questions of priorities, definitions of good and evil, questions of cultural and moral relativity, the nature of love, the challenges of suffering and death, and the nature of self-realization. Students will write about social and political issues, including imperialism, minority rights, feminism, food production, and the effect of human "progress" on the environment. Texts may include short works and excerpts by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Euripides, Aristotle, Shakespeare, Woolf, Orwell, Sartre, June Jordan, Al Gore, and Michael Pollan, as well as Eastern and Western religious texts (from the Book of Job to Buddhist texts), and topical newspaper articles. Students will focus on developing logical strategies, grammatical clarity, and rhetorical techniques, as well as close reading and research skills.
                    •   LFYW 1000 F   Writing the Essay I: Critical Theories of Finance  (CRN:4141) *BEST BET* 4 CR Nadal, Paul
                        MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                    • This writing seminar introduces students to critical theories of finance. We will survey recent and canonical works to arrive at an understanding of finance as an institutional system for the management of money, whose market rationality has extended beyond the economic sector and into other dimensions of human activity. We will begin by asking "What is money?", responding to classical definitions by Aristotle, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx. We will then study money's political lives, as debt and credit, and the kinds of human sociability these forms of capital imply. Finally, we will turn to a social history of 20th-century finance capital, tracing the fall of the international Gold Standard, neoliberalization of U.S. higher education, and the recent global financial crisis. As we examine these topics, our abiding concern will be to consider how money is not so much a thing as a social form, one that shapes fundamental ideas about value, work, personhood, and even our sense of time. We will engage this idea of money as social form from a multi-disciplinary perspective, drawing on readings from David Graeber, Friedrich Nietzsche, Pierre Bourdieu, Wendy Brown, among others.
                      •   LFYW 1000 G   Writing the Essay I: Multidimensional Storytelling and The Art of Seeing  (CRN:3099) 4 CR Steinmetz, Kristi
                          TR - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                      • According to art critic John Berger, "Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak." Now so, more than ever, multi-media content delivers images paired with words. Increasingly, in our hyper-packed digital world, we are simultaneously being told what we see and what stories to believe. But what stories are actually being told? And more importantly, what stories need telling? In this writing intensive course, we will focus on locating multidimensional stories of identity and experience within current cultural realities. Both reading and writing assignments will engage with a variety of creative and expository forms including prose poems, literacy narratives, cultural memoirs, autofictions, graphic dramadies, and critical essays. Course texts will include selections from Edward Said and Jean Mohr; Alison Bechdel and Virginia Woolf; Charles Duhigg (on Disney's Frozen); Claudia Rankine's Citizen: An American Lyric; David Shields's War is Beautiful; Joy Harjo's and Leslie Marmon Silko's storytelling; Kara Walker's silhouettes; I Am Malala (the memoir) and He Called Me Malala (the documentary); Marina Abramovic's performance art; Caitlyn Jenner's reality show I Am Cait; social media, mainstream ads, recent sitcoms, and experiential trips to the new Whitney Museum of American Art and The Met Breuer.
                        •   LFYW 1000 H   Writing the Essay I: Too Cool for School  (CRN:1457) 4 CR Bandele, Nkosi
                            TR - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                        • This writing course encourages students to consider the ways they are taught and the unspoken assumptions about their education. To do this effectively, students hone skills for reading, analyzing, and thinking critically about structures of thought implicit in formal education. They think through complicated issues, write to examine that thinking, share their ideas, and make arguments based on their perspectives and understandings. Authors include Paulo Freire, Adrienne Rich, Mary Louise Pratt, and Susan Griffin.
                          •   LFYW 1000 I   Writing the Essay I: Issues in Contemporary Culture  (CRN:4142) 4 CR Liebson, Jonathan
                              MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                          • This writing course offers a broad survey of social, political and cultural topics, ranging from issues of race, gender and violence to esthetics and urbanization—and sometimes the overlap among these. As the semester moves forward, students will have greater choice in pursuing topics of personal (and/or local) interest. The readings vary from personal narratives—by such writers as Brent Staples, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Katha Pollitt—to journalistic pieces to art or film.
                            •   LFYW 1000 J   Writing the Essay I: Too Cool for School  (CRN:3100) 4 CR Bandele, Nkosi
                                MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                            • This writing course encourages students to consider the ways they are taught and the unspoken assumptions about their education. To do this effectively, students hone skills for reading, analyzing, and thinking critically about structures of thought implicit in formal education. They think through complicated issues, write to examine that thinking, share their ideas, and make arguments based on their perspectives and understandings. Authors include Paulo Freire, Adrienne Rich, Mary Louise Pratt, and Susan Griffin.
                              •   LFYW 1000 K   Writing the Essay I: Writing the Environment  (CRN:1458) 4 CR Romig, Rollo
                                  TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                              • Humanity's conflicted relationship with the world around it is as old as the species itself. The movement known as environmentalism is much newer: as the environmental historian Ramachandra Guha argues, it's a movement best understood as a reaction to industrialization, and as such is no older than several hundred years. Wherever environmentalism has flourished, great writing has pushed it forward. In this course, we'll trace the history of this movement through the writers who have fueled it, from the Romantic poets to Rachel Carson, from Edward Abbey to Elisabeth Kolbert. Along the way you'll try your hand at your own environmental essays, bearing in mind that "the environment" isn't restricted to the great outdoors; the questions we'll be discussing are just as vital in the big city, and even inside your apartment.
                                •   LFYW 1000 L   Writing the Essay I: Love, Representation, and the Digital Era  (CRN:1888) *BEST BET* 4 CR Corcoran, Lucas
                                    TR - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                • Vanity Fair has dubbed Tinder the "dawn of the dating apocalypse." A recent article on online dating in The New Yorker asked, "Is dating worth the effort?" Clearly, digital representation has already had a profound impact on romance. In light of this, this writing-intensive course seeks to explore the history of representation, love, romance, and desire. Students will critically examine how digital spaces shape these concepts. Beginning with Plato's major works on love, the Symposium and the Phaedrus, we will trace historical representations of love over time and in relation to queer, feminist, post-colonial, and critical race theories. Alongside key works by thinkers as diverse as Plato, bell hooks, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, Saint Augustine, György Lukács, Sigmund Freud and Michel Foucault, students will critically engage with articles from popular publications, including Gawker, Jezebel, and Vice.
                                  •   LFYW 1000 M   Writing the Essay I: Space and Power  (CRN:3150) *BEST BET* 4 CR McElderry, Christina   TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                  • This writing intensive course explores the relationship between space and power. How is power inscribed and produced in and through different spaces, whether personal, community, or national? How is space constituted through networks of power, whether political, economic, or cultural? What networks of technology and authority are present in our everyday lives, particularly in dense urban spaces like New York City? We will start with the idea that to understand power one must think about space and spatial practices and that to understand space is to study power. We will investigate a variety of spatial practices and power formations, paying attention to political, social, economic, cultural, and ideological shifts around race/racialization, sexuality, gender, access/ability, and ideas of the public. The course combines readings in philosophy, geography, history, anthropology, and economics with a critical engagement with the spaces around us in New York City. In addition to active participation in discussions, students will complete a variety of written assignments and a final research paper.
                                    •   LFYW 1000 N   Writing the Essay I: Issues in Contemporary Culture  (CRN:1629) 4 CR Liebson, Jonathan
                                        MW - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                    • This writing course offers a broad survey of social, political and cultural topics, ranging from issues of race, gender and violence to esthetics and urbanization—and sometimes the overlap among these. As the semester moves forward, students will have greater choice in pursuing topics of personal (and/or local) interest. The readings vary from personal narratives—by such writers as Brent Staples, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Katha Pollitt—to journalistic pieces to art or film.
                                      •   LFYW 1000 O   Writing the Essay I: Worth and Power: On Looking and Writing  (CRN:1881) 4 CR Boutsikaris, Nina
                                          TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                      • Looking, gazing, watching: these are not neutral, passive activities, but rather socially constructed ones, learned relationships of power that affect our lives and shape our effects on others. Images of race, gender, class, and sexuality, though often subliminal, are constantly at work on our subconscious—through the media, advertising, psychological historical legacy, and the environments in which we are raised—informing worth, cultural currency, and social roles. By analyzing a variety of mainly contemporary writing (from authors such as Claudia Rankine, Susan Sontag, Maggie Nelson, T Fleischmann, and Ta-Nehisi Coates) and visual representation, this course will explore how power and worth, human or otherwise, are determined by the ways we look and how we ourselves are looked at. Through writing, workshopping, and re-writing, we will begin to uncover, from an analytical perspective, the breadth of our gaze and how the gaze of others affects our identities. We'll also explore creative techniques writers might call upon to reclaim, subvert, or otherwise negotiate this gaze.
                                        •   LFYW 1000 P   Writing the Essay I: Writing the Environment  (CRN:2237) *BEST BET* 4 CR Romig, Rollo
                                            TR - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                        • Humanity's conflicted relationship with the world around it is as old as the species itself. The movement known as environmentalism is much newer: as the environmental historian Ramachandra Guha argues, it's a movement best understood as a reaction to industrialization, and as such is no older than several hundred years. Wherever environmentalism has flourished, great writing has pushed it forward. In this course, we'll trace the history of this movement through the writers who have fueled it, from the Romantic poets to Rachel Carson, from Edward Abbey to Elisabeth Kolbert. Along the way you'll try your hand at your own environmental essays, bearing in mind that "the environment" isn't restricted to the great outdoors; the questions we'll be discussing are just as vital in the big city, and even inside your apartment.
                                          •   LFYW 1000 Q   Writing the Essay I: The Life of the Body  (CRN:5562) 4 CR Hyde, Jennifer
                                              TR - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                          • Knowing our bodies is a lifelong endeavor of the mind, yet the way our bodies grow and change is physical. Although studies of the body are pursued in both the hard sciences and in the humanities, it is the relationship between the two pursuits—the poem written with a head stick, or the fiction that de-stigmatizes mental illness, or a doctor's admission of the same shame a patient has felt—that can help us know who we are. In this writing-intensive seminar we will explore the literary documentation of mental and physical illness and anomalies from the perspective of the doctor and the patient, the caregiver and the self. Class texts will include poems, stories, essays, film, and visual art by, among others, Danielle Ofri, William Carlos Williams, Birgir Sellin, and Esme Weijun Wang. Using these texts, and our own personal experiences we will craft essays that explore how we think and write about visible and invisible illness.
                                            •   LFYW 1000 R   Writing the Essay I: Urban Sociology  (CRN:5563) 4 CR Hernandez, Mario   TR - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                            • This course is a study of the social construction of the city focused primarily on the US context. We will examine various themes related to the development of modern cities beginning with the consolidation of capitalism during the industrial revolution. We will consider the distinct experience of urban life as opposed to other modes of existence, or what Louis Wirth calls Urbanism as a Way of Life. In addition, we will look at forms of stratification such as race and class inequality and their relationship to spatial issues such as suburbanization and revitalization. We will also consider contemporary issues such as globalization, the revival or renewal process of many American cities, environmental issues, as well as the effect of new media in how we conceptualize the city. We will do all of this by focusing on the relationship between individual experiences and the effect of the urban environment on issues of identity construction and interpersonal relations. In order to develop critical thinking and engagement around these urban issues, the course emphasizes weekly writings and class participation in development towards a final paper.
                                              •   LFYW 1000 S   Writing the Essay I: The Modern Fairytale  (CRN:5572) *BEST BET* 4 CR Hach, Haley
                                                  TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                              • This writing-intensive course explores the necessity of storytelling and story-making through its most basic and natural histories: the Fairytale. What is necessary about the invention of a story and why do we repeat it? How does the story change as it passes across cultures and over time? How can various cultures express essentially the same story? Most importantly, what does this phenomenon say about us? In addition to reading fairytales and accompanying literary criticism on tales and their circulation, we will read basic elements of narrative theory. Students will investigate the prevalence of fairytales in contemporary literature and popular culture. Readings will include The Grimm Brothers, Charles Perrault, Giambattista Basile, Italo Calvino, Jack Zipes, Rebecca Solnit, Maria Tatar, Kazuo Ishiguro and others.
                                                •   LFYW 1000 T   Writing the Essay I: Multidimensional Storytelling and The Art of Seeing  (CRN:5573) 4 CR Steinmetz, Kristi
                                                    TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                • According to art critic John Berger, "Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak." Now so, more than ever, multi-media content delivers images paired with words. Increasingly, in our hyper-packed digital world, we are simultaneously being told what we see and what stories to believe. But what stories are actually being told? And more importantly, what stories need telling? In this writing intensive course, we will focus on locating multidimensional stories of identity and experience within current cultural realities. Both reading and writing assignments will engage with a variety of creative and expository forms including prose poems, literacy narratives, cultural memoirs, autofictions, graphic dramadies, and critical essays. Course texts will include selections from Edward Said and Jean Mohr; Alison Bechdel and Virginia Woolf; Charles Duhigg (on Disney's Frozen); Claudia Rankine's Citizen: An American Lyric; David Shields's War is Beautiful; Joy Harjo's and Leslie Marmon Silko's storytelling; Kara Walker's silhouettes; I Am Malala (the memoir) and He Called Me Malala (the documentary); Marina Abramovic's performance art; Caitlyn Jenner's reality show I Am Cait; social media, mainstream ads, recent sitcoms, and experiential trips to the new Whitney Museum of American Art and The Met Breuer.
                                                  •   LFYW 1000 U   Writing the Essay I: Citizenship and the Other  (CRN:2286) 4 CR Reilly, Rebecca
                                                      MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                  • Through a consideration of recent events in this country around race and violence, we begin a conversation in our own writing and thought on citizenship and the other: who belongs and who does not in a given society. Our primary text is poet Claudia Rankine's Citizen, a powerful new work which documents racial violence, both physical and psychological, in the United States today. Through Rankine's text, we consider recent events surrounding race in America: Ferguson, MO, Trayvon Martin, the death of Eric Garner and the social movements that have sprung up in their wake: who belongs and who does not in our own country. Inspired by Rankine, we document our own micro-aggressions in our writing, our personal encounters with the violence of racism or being "othered" on the basis of gender, sexuality, appearance, age, etc. Other texts include Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts, which investigates gender identity and normativity.
                                                    •   LFYW 1000 V   Writing the Essay I: Citizenship and the Other  (CRN:6568) 4 CR Reilly, Rebecca
                                                        MW - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                                    • Through a consideration of recent events in this country around race and violence, we begin a conversation in our own writing and thought on citizenship and the other: who belongs and who does not in a given society. Our primary text is poet Claudia Rankine's Citizen, a powerful new work which documents racial violence, both physical and psychological, in the United States today. Through Rankine's text, we consider recent events surrounding race in America: Ferguson, MO, Trayvon Martin, the death of Eric Garner and the social movements that have sprung up in their wake: who belongs and who does not in our own country. Inspired by Rankine, we document our own micro-aggressions in our writing, our personal encounters with the violence of racism or being "othered" on the basis of gender, sexuality, appearance, age, etc. Other texts include Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts, which investigates gender identity and normativity.
                                                      •   LFYW 1000 W   Writing the Essay I: Futures of Queer Theory  (CRN:7463) *BEST BET* 4 CR Gustafson, Ryan   TR - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                                      • This writing-intensive course will provide students with an introduction to queer theory—a radical paradigm for thinking about the psychology, culture, and politics of gender that emerged at the end of the 20th century. While it cannot be reduced to a single definition, queer theory can be broadly understood as the attempt to account for gender identities and experiences that have been deemed unintelligible, inhuman, or unnatural according to dominant social norms. As a response to some felt discrepancy between the experience of one's gender and the language and practices available to communicate that experience to others, queer theory is a site of resistance, creation, and invention. In addition to tracking the intellectual-historical development of queer theory, as well as using this paradigm to analyze non-normative gender practices in film, literature, and other media, throughout the course we will be preoccupied with a set of overriding questions: What are the tasks of queer theory today? How might this tradition be inherited to critique gender injustice in the present? What are the possible futures of queer theory to come?
                                                        •   LFYW 1000 X   Writing the Essay I: Writing About Place  (CRN:7464) 4 CR FitzGerald, Tara
                                                            MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                        • "We were on a train, out of the way of our lives, any of us could tell anything we liked. We were, for the time being, just the story we told," wrote Jenny Diski of a train journey she took around the United States. Travel writing can be many things at once: exploration of new terrain, discovery of the self, reinvention of the self, escapism, cultural education, and much much more. Travel writing is almost as old as both writing itself and man's urge to conquer the world around him, but in this modern age of all-access travel where anyone and everyone can blog about their adventures we will consider how and why certain travelogues rise above the fray. Through our own writing, as well as in-class discussions of texts by writers including Jenny Diski, Pico Iyer, Rebecca Solnit, Colin Thubron and Bruce Chatwin, in this writing-intensive course we will consider the role of place (how to make the unfamiliar familiar, or make the familiar new again) and self (who are you and/or who do you want to be?) in the acts of both traveling and then writing about traveling.
                                                          •   LFYW 1000 Y   Writing the Essay I: Great Stories: The Why & How  (CRN:7468) 4 CR Mungin, Rana Zoe (Rana)   MW - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                                          • We hear stories everywhere: from the progression of songs on Beyoncé's latest album to the talk of government email scandals on the nightly news. "Great stories," however, are a bit rarer, and according to Ira Glass, only occur to people who know how to tell them. With that in mind, this writing-intensive course focuses on the construction of compelling narratives and the relationship between our identities and our analytical selves. We will spend time with the great—and, perhaps, not-so-great—stories present in personal essays, news articles, research papers, and even the soundtracks to Broadway musicals, learning what we can as we work to construct and reconstruct our own increasingly complex narratives in writing. Assignments will range from the personal to critical, but we proceed with the understanding that all writing is inherently personal. Together, we will explore the power of storytelling, which allows us to give voice to our lives through telling our own stories and also to reclaim power that otherwise might be denied to us in the society in which we live. Readings will include selections from Kiese Laymon, Jamaica Kincaid, Gloria Anzaldua, Margaret Atwood, David K. Shipler, and others.
                                                            •   LFYW 1000 Z   Writing the Essay I: Writing About Place  (CRN:8474) 4 CR FitzGerald, Tara
                                                                MW - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                                            • "We were on a train, out of the way of our lives, any of us could tell anything we liked. We were, for the time being, just the story we told," wrote Jenny Diski of a train journey she took around the United States. Travel writing can be many things at once: exploration of new terrain, discovery of the self, reinvention of the self, escapism, cultural education, and much much more. Travel writing is almost as old as both writing itself and man's urge to conquer the world around him, but in this modern age of all-access travel where anyone and everyone can blog about their adventures we will consider how and why certain travelogues rise above the fray. Through our own writing, as well as in-class discussions of texts by writers including Jenny Diski, Pico Iyer, Rebecca Solnit, Colin Thubron and Bruce Chatwin, in this writing-intensive course we will consider the role of place (how to make the unfamiliar familiar, or make the familiar new again) and self (who are you and/or who do you want to be?) in the acts of both traveling and then writing about traveling.
                                                              •   LFYW 1500 A   Writing the Essay II: Globalization: Culture and Critique  (CRN:1459) *BEST BET* 4 CR Nadal, Paul
                                                                  MW - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                                                              • Globalization is often described as the process through which the world gets integrated. It represents an advanced stage in the development of capitalism, after the end of classical imperialism, in which innovations in mass-mediated technology, finance speculation, and warfare take the place of the industrial one. Yet, just as it signals a worldwide restructuring of economic production, globalization is also said to represent a radical change in political and cultural life. In the age of globalization, how do we imagine, express, and orient our sense of belonging in and resistance to this new world order? This research-based writing seminar introduces students to canonical works of globalization theory, equipping them with critical vocabularies for examining contemporary issues of development, migration, cross-cultural exchange, and inequality. We will ask: What are the competing definitions of globalization? How does globalization develop between the West and so-called Third World? What becomes of culture in the wake of mass consumerism and the spread of global communication technologies? Readings will range from sociological and ethnographic perspectives on globalization to humanistic inquiries into its impact on culture and politics. Students will development a research paper based on one of the course's themes.
                                                                •   LFYW 1500 B   Writing the Essay II: Architectural Narratives  (CRN:2380) *BEST BET* 4 CR Breydo, Olga
                                                                    TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                                                • This writing-intensive course explores architectural spaces that convey a strong social, political, or artistic narrative. Noting such design considerations as form, function, material, light and technology, students will investigate the role of architecture in public life. There are several iterations in the design process—from idea, to drawing, to 3D modeling, to construction. What is the writer's part in this multi-step transformation? How important is the critical interpretation and evocation of built environments? To explore these questions, we will examine specific architectural projects (such as The High Line by Diller & Scofidio, Guggenheim by Frank Lloyd Wright, Institut du Monde Arabe by Jean Nouvel, Church of the Light by Tadao Ando, and the Jewish Museum in Berlin by Daniel Libeskind) through drawings and images, as well as through a wide range of texts. Students will read designers' essays about their own work as well as writings by architectural critics such as Carter Wiseman and Alexandra Lange. Examples of successful critical and personal essays on other artistic genres (by such writers as Geoff Dyer, Dave Hickey, and John Berger) will also be explored. Throughout the semester, students will work on a major research paper on an architectural project of their choosing and write a critical essay that sheds light on a story told through architecture.